Despite decades of studies related to neurological connection in the skin, the field of neurocosmetics is at its infancy stages. It is also reflected in consumer awareness of the products and its potential benefits on their skin well being.

The number of consumer related searches is marginal, as indicated by google trends, Quora or Reddit, the most popular consumer research tools out there. There is even yet to be a Wikipedia term posted, which only indicates how little interest there is from the mass market.

Having said that search terms related to neuroplasticity and well being have been increasingly exponentially, as a results of increased focus on personal health and mindfulness related to social shifts of 2020 pandemic. Mass media, including Instagram and Facebook profiles, as well as YouTube videos and numerous podcasts focused on neurosciences. Ranging from university blogs like MIT News/Neuroscience, through renowned professors, like Stanford`s Prof Huberman, all the way to non credited mix of lifestyle commentators like Instagram`s neurohacker (https://www.instagram.com/neurohacker) devote increasing efforts to popularize neuroscientific facts among broader population. It seems only natural that the next steps will be specialization of the field zooming in on particular areas like neuroeasthetics, and more importantly for the purpose of this study, neurocosmetics.

The main drive behind the growth seem to be coming from the medical field, focused especially on treating severe skin conditions like psoriasis or eczema, as well as the innovative cosmetics like exploring neuroactive properties of various ingredients. From a cosmetics standpoint the next battleground is finding the most effective combinations of these ingredients providing the 360 treatment, via inner and outer beauty routines.

In partnerships with cosmetics labs in major cosmetic innovation hubs, like Switzerland, niche companies like I.D. Swiss Botanicals, take on the established players to lead the field of neurocosmetics and popularize them with the help of both scientific community and mass media.

Topical products lowering the stress levels and improving sleeping quality are gaining popularity, as the search for healthy skin continues, under new post COVID realities. As described at the start of this Whitepaper, more screen time and increased extrinsic anxieties will push forward the demand for holistic skincare products based on neuroactive natural ingredients like CBD and many others mentioned in the study.

The next challenge for those in search of neuroskinare will be to find products that can be more personalized to various skin types, as well as anatomical and physiological properties of individuals.

Some of the topics we expect to see more thoroughly research include, but are not limited to:

Effective combination of topical and consumable neurocosmetics for maximum efficacy

How the night skincare routine affects the quality of sleep

Neuroactive skincare and cortisol levels

Clinical studies for many of these products` properties are well on their way and consumer feedback is overwhelming positive on existing products, further inspiring the researchers and cosmetics experts to pursue the path of neurocosmetics.

So, what’s next for the Neurocosmetics?

Despite decades of studies related to neurological connection in the skin, the field of neurocosmetics is at its infancy stages. It is also reflected in consumer awareness of the products and its potential benefits on their skin well being.

The number of consumer related searches is marginal, as indicated by google trends, Quora or Reddit, the most popular consumer research tools out there. There is even yet to be a Wikipedia term posted, which only indicates how little interest there is from the mass market.

Having said that search terms related to neuroplasticity and well being have been increasingly exponentially, as a results of increased focus on personal health and mindfulness related to social shifts of 2020 pandemic. Mass media, including Instagram and Facebook profiles, as well as YouTube videos and numerous podcasts focused on neurosciences. Ranging from university blogs like MIT News/Neuroscience, through renowned professors, like Stanford`s Prof Huberman, all the way to non credited mix of lifestyle commentators like Instagram`s neurohacker (https://www.instagram.com/neurohacker) devote increasing efforts to popularize neuroscientific facts among broader population. It seems only natural that the next steps will be specialization of the field zooming in on particular areas like neuroeasthetics, and more importantly for the purpose of this study, neurocosmetics.

The main drive behind the growth seem to be coming from the medical field, focused especially on treating severe skin conditions like psoriasis or eczema, as well as the innovative cosmetics like exploring neuroactive properties of various ingredients. From a cosmetics standpoint the next battleground is finding the most effective combinations of these ingredients providing the 360 treatment, via inner and outer beauty routines.

In partnerships with cosmetics labs in major cosmetic innovation hubs, like Switzerland, niche companies like I.D. Swiss Botanicals, take on the established players to lead the field of neurocosmetics and popularize them with the help of both scientific community and mass media.

Topical products lowering the stress levels and improving sleeping quality are gaining popularity, as the search for healthy skin continues, under new post COVID realities. As described at the start of this Whitepaper, more screen time and increased extrinsic anxieties will push forward the demand for holistic skincare products based on neuroactive natural ingredients like CBD and many others mentioned in the study.

The next challenge for those in search of neuroskinare will be to find products that can be more personalized to various skin types, as well as anatomical and physiological properties of individuals.

Some of the topics we expect to see more thoroughly research include, but are not limited to:

Effective combination of topical and consumable neurocosmetics for maximum efficacy

How the night skincare routine affects the quality of sleep

Neuroactive skincare and cortisol levels

Clinical studies for many of these products` properties are well on their way and consumer feedback is overwhelming positive on existing products, further inspiring the researchers and cosmetics experts to pursue the path of neurocosmetics.

So, what’s next for the Neurocosmetics?

Recent developments in the neurobiology focusing on exploring the connection between the skin and brain are only the beginning of the exciting journey of neurocosmetics. The future of the field looks very interesting, as new tests and research results are emerging around both the potency of individual ingredients, the dosage, and individual characteristics of skincare users.

Various streams of research are ongoing to determine :

  • most effective natural ingredients that could be used to formulate neurocosmetics
  • penetration of neuroactive ingredients via cutaneous tissue
  • consuming neuroactive ingredients via sublingual and oral use
  • combination and dosage of ingredients for most optimal results
  • other factors that influence the effectives and efficacy, like personal skin DNA

As neurocosmetics are entering the mainstream cosmetics industry, starting to appear on the shelves of international retailers, as well as accessing customers through online boutiques the demand created will fuel investments in the field. Customers searching for more efficiency and treating the causes rather than symptoms of skin imperfections are much more inclined to test neurocosmetics, especially the ones based on natural ingredients.

Some brands, like I.D. Swiss Botanicals, take a bolder approach creating the organizations with Neurocosmetics as a DNA rather than an interesting product addition. Enriching already potent serums containing Hyaluronic Acid or vitamin C with neuroactive ingredients like CBD, swiss stone pine extract and others is the path to increased adoption of neurocosmetics among broader population. Expanding anecdotal and lab evidence of combined function of well-being and sleep quality and skin will support further product development, as consumers search for their ideal skincare products.

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